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how to bake plastigoop with a lamp

Posted: Thu Aug 27, 2009 4:50 pm
by judyjowers
I would like to bake plasti-goop but do not have a toy oven. The plastic would illustrate well the difference between temperature induced cross-linking in plastics vs. chemical cross-linking. How can I bake the plasti-goop with a lamp?

Re: how to bake plastigoop with a lamp

Posted: Thu Aug 27, 2009 11:13 pm
by dr_goop
In order to get the plasti-goop to cure properly it must get up to 290-315 F. Any hotter and it might burn. Lower and it might not fully cure. Lower takes longer, higher is much faster. I personally use a Black and Decker toaster over and just dial the temperature and watch through the window. The contemporary ovens do use a light bulb. A heat lamp might work. You could put the lamp right over the mold or put the mold on top of a bulb with a flat face like a flood light. No matter what set up you use you must follow the temperature rules stated above. You might be able to take an old cookie box tin and make a hole big enought to get a light bulb in and that way the box might help retain the heat and do a better job of cooking your goop.

I wouldn't think of Plasti-goop in the context of cross linking in plastics. I would think of plasti-goop as gelling just like Jello. The resin is suspended in a solution that is a poor solvent at room temp, but is a great solvent at high temperatures. In Plasti-goop the polymer is wrapped up in a little ball and all the microscopic balls make the Plasti-goop look milky. When the polymers melt they unravel and diffuse into a homogeneous dispersion that then looks more translucent.

Hope that helps.

Re: how to bake plastigoop with a lamp

Posted: Tue Sep 29, 2009 7:20 am
by omnichi1962
I use an electric pancake griddle that I bought for $30 at Walmart. It is so large that I can bake several molds at once. I set it for 350 degrees and rarely burn the Goop as long as I pay attention. Sometimes I put aluminum foil over the molds, if the Goop is extra thick.

Joseph Jester