Molds & Business Cards & Stuff

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Posts: 559
Joined: Sat Oct 31, 2009 1:36 pm

Re: Molds & Business Cards & Stuff

Postby Archives » Sat Nov 07, 2009 1:19 pm

omnichi
Registered: 08/10/06
Posts: 85
11/06/06 at 04:18 PM
Reply with quote #11

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I'm going to toot my own horn. Check out Dr-Goop.com He posted pictures of one of my first tin molds with the original and some Goop moldings I cast from the mold.

Thanks Dr. Goop!

Joseph Jester

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Posts: 559
Joined: Sat Oct 31, 2009 1:36 pm

Re: Molds & Business Cards & Stuff

Postby Archives » Sat Nov 07, 2009 1:19 pm

pattigoop


Registered: 10/02/06
Posts: 28
11/08/06 at 12:43 AM
Reply with quote #12

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Hi Joseph Jester,

How did you make your tin molds?

thanks

Patty

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Posts: 559
Joined: Sat Oct 31, 2009 1:36 pm

Re: Molds & Business Cards & Stuff

Postby Archives » Sat Nov 07, 2009 1:20 pm

omnichi
Registered: 08/10/06
Posts: 85
11/08/06 at 02:17 PM
Reply with quote #13

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Hi Patty and everyone,

I made my first prototype tin molds this way: I cut a block of wood to act as a base, then I used epoxy putty to make a sculpture on the wood. I built a wall around the wooden base, using more blocks of wood. I got solder (now made of 100% tin, no lead), melted it, and poured it into the forms. Now, one thing that happened was the molten tin started burning the wood forms which released smoke which made the molten tin bubble (think Yellowstone mud pots LOL). Using another block of wood, I kept pushing the tin down into the forms until it became solid. Because of all this bubbling, I had one part where a tin bubble formed over the sculpture. Luckily this happened on the forehead of my skull, so I took a drill and made a "horn" disguising the imperfection. The mold was also thick and heavy. When I first tried it with Goop, it took forever to cook the Goop. I drilled some holes completely through the mold to lighten it. It now works fine. This whole process took about 3 days, maybe 5 hours total time. I will probably only be able to get one mold per try this way.

I'm now working on another method, using silicone rubber: I start the same way with a wood block that I sculpt on with epoxy putty. But, the next step I use a cold curing silicone rubber to make the first copy of the original. I've completed this step. The next step is to make another silicone rubber mold of the first copy. So, I'm making a mold of the original and then a mold of the mold. The silicone rubber is a special heat tolerant type that can take molten tin. I've worked with it before and it is great for making tin soldiers. I should have a working mold by the end of the month.

Thanks for asking,
Joseph

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Posts: 559
Joined: Sat Oct 31, 2009 1:36 pm

Re: Molds & Business Cards & Stuff

Postby Archives » Sat Nov 07, 2009 1:21 pm

omnichi
Registered: 08/10/06
Posts: 85
12/05/06 at 02:17 AM
Reply with quote #14

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Hi all,

I've succeeded in making another tin mold! I used silicone rubber to make a mold of a pumpkin I had sculpted and tonight I poured tin into the rubber mold. I made two tin molds and poured Goop into one and it worked!

I have had to make the tin molds thicker than the Mattel zinc molds. This makes the mold take longer to heat up. I found that I can speed things along by putting an aluminum foil "lid" over the mold.

I used orange Goop. When it was cooked, I took it out of the mold and then used an exacto-knife to cut a jack-o-lantern face in the pumpkin. I put the pumpkin back into the mold, heated it up until the orange Goop was sticky, then I poured black Goop into the holes I had cut. It came out as a perfect jack-o-lantern.

I am learning all kinds of things which will make the next mold easier to make and more likely to work better. Not sure if there is anything I can do about the thickness of the tin molds. Tin is a less hard, more pliable metal than zinc, so I think it needs to be thicker than the Mattel molds for it to work.

I will keep you informed of any further developments.

Your Goop friend,
Joseph


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