My fun with goop

Archives
Posts: 559
Joined: Sat Oct 31, 2009 1:36 pm

My fun with goop

Postby Archives » Sun Nov 08, 2009 10:55 pm

GFSCtoys
Registered: 03/16/07
Posts: 2
03/16/07 at 09:17 PM
Reply with quote #1

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Fun with goop....I spent many hours making and trying things as a kid. One of my best creations came from filling a mold ..lets say a crab with goop and just get it starting to cook and then sling out most of the uncooked goop, then finish cooking and end up with this paper thin critter. I come from a very small town and very little money, the closet place to get more goop was K-mart 50 miles away so Elms glue, and food coloring sufficed to work for goop but the things melted in my pockets.. My Mom Knowing I was out of goop came up with a better deal than that and we scrambled eggs and made the best Creeple people breakfasts.. green and all .. As I got older I discovered my Dad making fishing sinkers on our gas stove top. One Saturday morning all was gone and I spotted the ladle in the garage and heck my box of molds were right there too.To my amazement I made a dozen skulls from my fright factory set and they turned out perfect each time and released from the mold no problem. So then no lead headed barn roofing nail or tire weight was safe. I started selling skulls for 25 cents a piece and Creeple people heads too.. I soon discovered in sufficient quantity lead will melt completely through a mold .. from then on everything was poured in a mold sitting in water bath. My grand father saw the money I was making and since he owned three filling stations he managed to give me a five gallon bucket of tire weights (more than I ever used, wonder what happened to them). Thought your readers might be interested in trivial doings but they are great memories. I would love to make molds, and am getting close to knowing how does anyone actually know how? Also, I am still looking for the complete set of the Warner Bros' Tweety Sylvester.. and ?? molds. Let me know what you think. Pat
PS. kids do not try any of this without adult supervision, times are much different today than in the 60's - lead burns deep, and a little water turns to steam and can spray everywhere.

Archives
Posts: 559
Joined: Sat Oct 31, 2009 1:36 pm

Re: My fun with goop

Postby Archives » Sun Nov 08, 2009 10:56 pm

dr_goop


Registered: 01/21/06
Posts: 44
03/16/07 at 11:47 PM
Reply with quote #2

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I have always loved those kind of dangerous experiments even as a kid. Pat, some how I thought you were here all along but were just being quiet, welcome to the group. As far as making molds there are two mold experimenters on this site "omnichi" and "GaryR". They make molds out of metal. In some of the threads I mentioned that I know of another guy who makes molds out of RTV silicone that is stable at high temps. You can find it at hardware stores as a fire barrier sealant rated to like 700 F (370 C). The thing is though that it doesn't hold up well to baking due to poor heat transfer. To get around that you have to use a highly plasticticized resin so that it is liquid at high temps, heat it in a container and then pour it into the silicone molds. I also have recently procured an approximate formula to a pot metal welding metal alloy(melt temp ~700 F). I suspect it is very similar to the original 60's CC mold material or maybe slightly more advanced since it is still in use. Here is that approximate formula; Zinc >80%, Aluminum 5-16%, Copper 1-5%, Magnesium ~.05%.

Archives
Posts: 559
Joined: Sat Oct 31, 2009 1:36 pm

Re: My fun with goop

Postby Archives » Sun Nov 08, 2009 10:56 pm

omnichi
Registered: 08/10/06
Posts: 85
03/17/07 at 08:57 AM
Reply with quote #3

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Hi,

I thought I was the only "crazy" out there who poured lead into creepy crawler molds. It started in 1980 with my dad pouring the lead for me into the Giant Spider molds (still have the castings). In 2002 I started pouring tin into the Fright Factory skull to make "Grim Dollars" for a live-action role-playing group, most were amazed and thought it was great and mysterious. I made almost a 1000 skull coins and never burnt though the Fright Factory molds. Oh, they did deform a little. I only did 10 or 20 at time when maybe kept the molds from getting too hot.

Last year I started making my own molds. I make the original, make a silicone rubber mold from that, then pour tin into the rubber mold. Dr. Goop, I'm pretty sure that I have to get the temperature of the tin up to around 700 Fahrenheit before it is liquid enough to pour. When I use my tin molds at 350 degrees, I've seen no evidence of melting. I think Mattel and others don't use tin because it is so expensive compared to zinc or aluminum alloys. This is just a guess on my part. I like tin because you can get it at hardware stores and you don't have to worry about getting alloys just right.

I've been really busy lately, but I'll keep trying my experiments just because it's fun.

Joseph Jester/ Omnichi


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